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®f) e Campus 

VOL. LV. MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1960 NO. 15 



Ellington, Madden Will Play 
At Jazz Fest, Carnival Ball 
For 29 th Annual Winter Blast 


Informal Jazz Concert To Replace 
Klondike Rush on Saturday Evening 

With exams well over and rush- fine music, Duke Ellington is 
ing begun, all thoughts are turn- 0 ne of the greatest composer 
ing to Middlebury’s Winter Carni- American jazz His composi1 

val. Scheduled for Feb. 25-28, this 

, , , u u „ , cover every field of jazz anc 

29th annual weekend holds much , , , „ J 

. +VlQ elude such famous pieces as ‘ 

in store musically for the cam- ^ 

and Bothered,” ‘‘Rockin’ in 1 

pus. 

, , thm,” ‘‘Black and Tan Fanta 

A main feature of the weekend .. Tishaming0 Blues> , and ,. Do 

will be an informal concert fea- thin , <Xil You Hear from j 
turing the jazz artist Duke Ell- Through this work E ii ingtcm 
ington. Scheduled for Saturday made a great contr i but i on to 
night, the show will continue until history of jazz 
midnight. The price of admission, .... 

$3.00, is covered by the combo u The traditional Carnival Ball 
ticket ' “ e held F ri “ a y mght from 9 ] 

to 1 a. m. in the Field House 
No Introduction always, the highlight of the 

To anyone who is at all famil- wiU be the coronation of the C£ 
iar with jazz, Duke Ellington needs val King and Queeni to be ele 
no introduction. Born in Washing- by the entire student body on a 
ton in 1899, he rapidly rose to fame dayi Feb 22 Admission to 
in the jazz-loving twenties. Ball, not included in the co: 

Ellington studied at the Fine Art ticket, is $3.75 per couple. 
School of the Pratt Institute in Distinctive Style 

Washington, devoting all his time Eddie Maddeni well-known ] 
to the contemporary popular mus- England orch estra leader, 
ic. His own distinctive style, nev- furnish music for the ball . Mac 
er successfully imitated, was crea. writes all his own arrangem 
ted from the basic structure of 


NO DOUBT: Jane MacFarlane as Cindy shone in the pre-exam 
presentations of the student-written musical. As a barroom queen, 
Miss MacFarlane performed “with professional technique and 
command of all she surveyed.” 


Wo Doubt ’ Begins to Hit Its 
Stride as a Campus Classic 


DUKE ELLINGTON 

/ 

. . . king of jazz 


'60. The show proved an example 
of successful integration of songs, 
dances, appealing characteriza¬ 
tions and story line. 

Sparkle and Life 

Judith Johnson '61 as Paige 
brought sparkle and life into her 
every line. Throughout the play, 
and especially in her very impres¬ 
sive second-act solo, in which she 
lets her hair down and loses her 
inhibitions 


Madden has also appeared with 
such artists as Patti Page, the 
Four Lads, Jerry Vale, th^ Ames 
Brothers and Frankie Lane. 

Combo tickets for the weekend, 
costing $6.00 for Mountain Club 
members and $6.75 for non-mem¬ 
bers, will go on sale Monday. As in 
past years, Combo will cover all 
ski events, lunch at the Bowl on 
Saturday, the Ice Show and the 
Ellington concert. Carnival pro¬ 
grams, priced at 50 cents, will also 
go on sale Monday. 

This year free transportation 
will be provided from the Bread- 
loaf Campus to the Snow Bowl to 
alleviate the parking problem. Bus¬ 
es will run every day from the 
campus to the Bowl. 


time-honored 
tradition of staid secretaries, she 
showed an adroit sense of comedy. 

As her opposite number, Bruce 
Richards '60 was a trifle flat but 
was generally convincing as an ul¬ 
tra-innocent, clean-cut, All-Ameri¬ 
can young man. 

George Jay ’60 gave a very 
smooth performance as General 
Quentin. The general’s Regular 


Schiller Flies 
To Colombia 


Pieter Schiller ’60 is presently 
travelling in Columbia, South Am¬ 
erica, in conjunction with his sen¬ 
ior honors project. 

Schiller left New York City by 
plane on Jan. 31. He plans to re¬ 
turn Feb. 17. 

In Columbia he will interview 
high government officials and offi¬ 
cers of the Bank of the Republic 
in an effort to discover the role 
which American capital has played 
in that country. The title of his 
(Continued on Page 5) 


Two - Week Rushing Period 
Now Underway on Campus 


last from 8 p. m. next Friday 
through 10 a. m. Monday, Feb. 22. 

Bids will be picked up Monday 
morning Feb. 22. Pledging will 
take place that day. 

John Gilwee, IFC president, and 
Janet Krei, president of Pan-Hel¬ 
lenic, both hope that rushing -will 
be successful for all concerned. 
Gilwee noted the shorter time al¬ 
lowed for smokers and said that 
the reduced time was “negligible” 
and would probably have no great 
effect. 


Second semester commenced 
with rushing for both men and wo¬ 
men. 


Meetings were held Monday aft¬ 
ernoon to explain rushing proced¬ 
ures. The men’s meeting was spon¬ 
sored by the Interfraternity Coun¬ 
cil; the women’s by the Panhellen- 
[ ic Council. Men were required to 
j pay a $3.00 rushing fee; women 
I paid 50 cents. 

Open Houses 

On Monday and last evening the 
sororities entertained at open 
houses, First parties will be given 
I tomorrow evening and Sunday. 

After informals Monday after¬ 
noon, freshman women will sign 
for the second parties they wish 
to attend. Second parties will take 
place on Wednesday, next Thurs¬ 
day and Friday evenings. 

Bids will be delivered early Sun¬ 
day morning; pledging will take 
place during that day. 

Men have been attending com¬ 
pulsory smokers every evening 
this week and will continue to do 
so tonight and tomorrow evening. 
Each freshman is required to at¬ 
tend two compulsory smokers at 
each fratenity. Sunday through Fri¬ 
day next there will be open smo¬ 
kers. Fraternity men may visit the 
rooms of freshmen Monday through 
Friday afternoons. 

Commitments cannot bd offered! 
before 1 p. m. Wednesday. Fresh¬ 
men will sign preferential lists on 
Friday evening. 

Period of Silence 

A period of silence during which 
there will be no contact between 
fraternity and freshman men will 


JOHN SCOTT 
. world traveler 


Rehfuss Presents Concert 
S o Sparse, Keen Audience 


World Traveler 
Talks on Russia 


World traveller and foreign cor¬ 
respondent John Scott, assistant to 
the publisher of TIME, Will iis- 
'The Soviet Empire” at 8 
Feb, 19 in Wright Memorial 
Theater. 

Just returned from eastern Eu¬ 
rope and Russia, Mr. Scott is con¬ 
sidered a “Russian expert.” He 
spent five years there in th<* 1930’s 
after leaving college to see-the- 
world-and-write. He worked in 
Russian steel mills and chemical 
plants until the 1937 purge forced 
him and many other foreigners out 
of the Soviet industry. His book 
“Beyond the Urals” is based on 
these experiences. 

Scott worked for various West¬ 
ern news agencies in Moscow un¬ 
til two weeks before the German 
attack on the U.S.S.R. Accused of 
“slandering” Soviet foreign policy 
and “inventing” reports of Soviet- 
German friction, he then went to 
Japan and joined the TIME staff. * 

He has served as a fact-finder 
in England, Sweden, Germany, Au. 
stria, Greece, Turkey, Italy, the 
Middle East, France, Latin Amer¬ 
ica and Africa. His latest book, now 
on the presses, is entitled “Demo¬ 
cracy is not Enough.” 


By THOMAS DEWOLFE 

Heinz Rehfuss, renowned throughout Europe as song 
recitalist and opera singer, was well appreciated and 
warmly received Sunday night in the first Concert-Lecture 
Series’ performance of the semester. 

The concert, however, was urn- sic, which are of secondary qua- 
fortunately scheduled for the last lity. There are some 600 of these 
day of vacation, and there were songs, some of which are not as 
few students in the tiny audience, good as others. 

We have been fortunate this year However, the six that we heard 
in that our visiting artists have were most enjoyable, comprised of 
usually presented programs which qualities for which Schubert is 
give us a good cross-section of the famous: memorability of melody 
media each presents. and consistent dramatic character- 

No Exception istics. 

Rehfuss was no exception. The Many art songs employed cur- 
program included art songs of rent poetry of good quality; it is 
Schubert, Brahms, Schoeck and to be deplored that texts and trans- 
Berg, which represent a century of lations were not provided for the 
the German tradition which began audience with the program. Reh- 
W’ith Schubert; songs of Debussy fuss obviously enjoyed singing, and 
fl nd Honnegger (French), and a cy- often the well-trained voice ach- 
cle of Russian songs by Moussorg- ieved a nuance which led \us to be- 
sky. iieve that something important had' 

Schubert (1768-1824) was the first been delivered, 
great composer of the art song, No Translation 

a >id no composer has ever gone j Members of the audience who 
beyond the heigts he reached with had had no German or French (or 
this medium. It is exactly in this Italian, in one Schubert song) were 
form, in fact, the Schubert ach- out of luck. After all, these songs 
'eves his greatness, rising above were written at least partially with 
bis symphonies and chamber mu- (Continued on F«ge 8) 


Inside Story 

SENSIBLE: New seminar 

procedure test for EPC propo¬ 
sal. Editorial. Page 2. 


cuss 


RETURN: Flavin continues 
discussion of Barzun’s book. 


PROTEST: Campus spirits 
stirred by ROTC controversy. 

Page 3 


VICTORS: Middlebury takes 
second - in - a - row Dartmouth 
Carnival. Page 6 


GOOD: Teacher Training 

program results “satisfying, 
Page 7 


BONGO: New U. S. sport is 
introduced. Page 8. 


PANEL: Conference sched¬ 
ules five speakers. Page 9, 


DANFORTH: Chaplain Scott 
reports on recent Chicago 
trip. Page 10. 






PAGE 2 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1960 


Down to Earth 

Implementation of one phase of the Educational 
Policy Committee’s proposal has taken place in the 
second semester of the English seminar. 

Although the English department denies that the 
idea evolved from the EPC proposal, the seminar 
bears close resemblance to the “program of Major 
Reading” suggested in last fall’s report. Proposed was 
a non-credit, full year of assigned reading; there would 
be no regular meetings of the seminar group. Majors 
would prepare for their General Examination through 
readings and frequent consultation with advisors in 
their major. The EPC hoped not only greater breadth 
within the major for a correlation of cognate areas 
would be achieved. 

The English department appears to have develop¬ 
ed a modification of the proposal. The seminar carries 
the usual credits but will have no scheduled meetings. 
In addition to a lengthy reading list, majors are given a 
schedule of consultation hours with members of the 
department. Each professor will be available for dis¬ 
cussion of his specialities with any major in the de¬ 
partment on an individual and purely voluntary basis. 
“Comps” will provide the entire semester’s grade. 

Other departments have made slight changes in 
seminar procedure. The American literature depart¬ 
ment will substitute reports covering broad areas of 
literature and literary background for the former con¬ 
centration on individual authors and works within the 
regular seminar meetings. The department hopes to 
achieve a more unified coverage of the field. 

Positive action of this sort within the areas em¬ 
braced by the EPC in their proposal will go much far¬ 
ther toward exposing the merits and weaknesses of the 
program than has been accomplished to date. One of 
the primary hopes of the “four-course plan” and its al¬ 
lied features was to provide more individual research; 
this is the direction in which these departments have 
sought to adapt their seminars. The departments that 
have shouted from the rooftops their fears of impend¬ 
ing doom might do well to consider similar attempts. 


A New Spirit 

As “No Doubt About It” becomes a College legend, 
the ancient myth of apathy on the Middlebury campus 
receives a long-overdue negation. Produced by and for 
the student body, the original musical earned instantan¬ 
eous and universal acclaim: a spirited performance by 
an enthusiastic cast and the response of equally en¬ 
thusiastic audiences demonstrated that Middlebury 
students can indeed do something well and enjoy do¬ 
ing it. 

It is to be hoped that some of the enthusiasm gen¬ 
erated by “No Doubt About It” will survive, not only 
within Wright Theater but without. Both a repeat per- 
fonnance of the play and an extension of the atmos¬ 
phere it created would be welcomed. 


THE CAMPUS 


Tiie student newspaper of Middlebury College, published every Thurs¬ 
day In the College year, except during official College holidays. 

Second-olass postage paid at the Post Office, Middlebury, Vermont. 

Editorial and business offices In Recitation Hall, Middlebury College, 
Middlebury, Vermont. Telephones: Dudley 8-2813, 2701, 4810 and 2587. Busi¬ 
ness hours Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Subscription rate: $4.00 per year. Represented for national advertis¬ 
ing by the National Advertising Service, Inc. Member, the Associated Col¬ 
legiate Press. 

Opinions expressed on the editorial page do not necessarily reflect the 
official position of the College. Signed columns, letters and articles are 
the responsibility of the writer. 

All contributions to this newspaper are subject to Its editorial policy 
and style rules. The editorial board reserves the right to edit and con¬ 
dense letters received for publication. 


CAROLINE SMITH '60 ..' Editor-In-Chief 

MICHAEL ROBINSON '60 . Business Manager 


ALFRED FARRELL ’61 
Executive Editor 

JANE COLLINS '60 
Managing Editor 

JOHN KERNEY '61 
Sports Editor 



PRESS 


ANNE HORTON '60 
Circulation Manager 

BARBARA EVERARD '61 
National Advt. Manager 

JOHN FALBY '61 
Local Advt. Manager 


Frederic W. Swift . . . Faculty Advisor 
Lloyd Cauchon, The Addison Press, Inc., Page Makeup 


EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 

Richard Blodgett '62, News Editor. David Hullhan '61, Photography Edi¬ 
tor. Ann Skinner 61, Feature Editor. Carolyn Eyster '61, Copy Editor. Sam 
Orth '62, Assistant Make-up Editor. Antoinette Tesoniero 60, Outside Editor. 
Ruth Goddard '62, Exchange Editor. Janet Reed '61, Morgue Operator. 


BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 

Kaarl lives '61, Assistant Circulation Manager. William Maxwell *61, 
Assistant Local Advertising Manager. Mary Seelye '60, Comptroller. Dan 
Sokoloskl '61, Office Manager. Barbara Machen '60, Office Coordinator. 
ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Molly Dugan '60. Richard Harris '61. Paul Boyd '60. James Dunlop 
'62, William White '62, Diane Alpern '62. Barbara Miller '62. 

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS 

Jane Cain '60, Pat Johnson '60, Michael Sweet '61, Michael Kullck 
'62, Barbara Buchanan '62, Jerl Harris '62, Phyllis Homlak '62, Ellen Stein '62. 


EDITORIAL STAFF 

John Combs '60, Lee Farnham '60, Anne DeSola '60, Lee Kaufman '81, 
George Logan '61, Richard Rudick '61, Mary Jo Ageton '61, Anne Jenkyns 
'61 Marlon Yeaman '61, Thomas Meehan '62, William Whyte 62, Pamela 
Kauffman '62, Anna Marshall '62, Edward Baker '63, John Carpenter 63, 
Kenneth Delmar '63, Eric Horstlng '63, John Simpson '63, Victor Thompson 
'63, Richard Werner '63, Anne Belser '63, Helen Geyh 63, Susan Wash- 
bourne ’63, Midhele Whitney ’63. 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Derek Peske '60, Mary Lutton '60, Claus Mueller '61. Peter McLagan '62, 
Barbara Burr '62, Judith Clarke '62, Marrem Ward '62, Mary Woodbury 62, 
Nora Wright '62, Stephen Adams '63, Harry Blaine '63, Mark Canglano 63, 
Charles Sellhelmer '63. 


FACULTY FORUM _ 

Professor Discusses Academic 
Differences in Barzun’s ‘House’ 


By EMERY W. FLAVIN 
Instructor in Sociology- 
Anthropology 

Examination of the house of in¬ 
tellect by both architects and crL 
tics has turned up what may be 
evidence of unsound structure. 
One of the most serious weakness¬ 
es appears to be a state of increas¬ 
ing mutual exclusiveness not only 
between the toilers in the various 
vineyards of knowledge as persons 
but between the different bodies of 
substantive knowledge themselves. 

CONSIDERING ONLY its impli¬ 
cations for the growth of know¬ 
ledge, perhaps the greatest misfor¬ 
tune resulting from mutual exclu¬ 
siveness and its attendent speciali¬ 
zation is the breakdown of a pro¬ 
cess whereby the various fields of 
knowledge can aid each other in 
their collective enterprise. That is, 
as one field of study comes upon a 
problem which has been a prob¬ 
lem for another field, too, “cross¬ 
checking” 'can either prevent waste 
through repetition, help to define 
the problem in a way that accounts 
for all the known facts, or prevent 
error by showing that a particular 
approach is incompetent to handle 
the problem as defined. 

A striking example of what may 
be misunderstanding resulting 
from lack of crosschecking be¬ 
tween disciplines is the paper pre¬ 
sented recently to the Darwin 
Centennial at the University of 
Chicago by Nobel Prize-winning 
geneticist Professor Hermann J. 
Muller. The New York Times quo¬ 
tes Professor Muller as follows: 
Through billions of years of 
blind mutations, pressing a- 
gainst the shifting walls of 
their environment microbes fin¬ 
ally emerged as men. We are 
no longer blind; at least we 
are beginning to be conscious 
of what has happened and of 
what may happen. From now 
on evolution is what we make 
it, provided that we choose the 
true and the good. Otherwise 
we shall sink back into oblivion 
. . .At the present time mo. 
dern culture is giving rein to 
biological decadence. 

The only method consistent 
with cultural progress whereby 
this situation can be met (is) 
the increasing recognition by 
individuals of their responsibi¬ 
lity not only for the education 
and living conditions but also 
for the genetic endowment of 
the generations succeeding 
them. 

The main values to be stri¬ 
ven for (in a program of eu¬ 
genics) are the same as those 
already recognized as the 
chief aims in the bringing up 
and education of children — ' 
more robust health; keener, 
deeper and more creative in¬ 
telligence; genuine warmth of 
fellow feeling and cooperative 
disposition; and richer apprec¬ 
iation of man’s intellectual and 
spiritual values and its more 
adequate expression. All these 
factors require the proper en¬ 
vironment and education for 
their development, but it is the 
genetic endowment of an indi¬ 
vidual that forms the basis of 
their realization. An individual 
with the genetic endowment of 
a Lincoln, for example, will 
overcome any obstacle of an 
unfavorable environment and 
lack of education opportunities. 

In the service of this moral¬ 
ity foster pregnancy made pos¬ 
sible by the techniques of arti¬ 
ficial insemination would be 
welcomed. 

Now one might be for or against 
such a program of controlled evo¬ 
lution for a variety of reasons. 
With these matters of opinion and 
sentiment we are not concerned. 
Neither are we concerned with whe¬ 
ther physiological science can sol¬ 


ve the strictly genetic problems 
inhering in the proposal, Let us as¬ 
sume that it can. 

THE QUESTION we choose is 
whether there are empirically ver¬ 
ifiable nonphysiological considera¬ 
tions that preclude any program 
of genetically guided human evo¬ 
lution. There appear to be at least 
two. The first of these is simply 
the well-established principle that 
logico-experimental methods can¬ 
not determine in any final sense 
the relative validity of the ends or 
goals of human social action. More 
specifically, genetic science cannot 
determine the ends toward which 
its efforts might be directed. Nor 
can any other science, social or 
physical, do so. Professor Muller 
implies this, I think, when he rec¬ 
ommends that we support aims al¬ 
ready recognized as important in 
the raising of children. He names 
creative intelligence, cooperative 
disposition and appreciation of 
man’s intellectual and spiritual va¬ 
lues and chief aims to be pro¬ 
moted genetically. Now it should 
be obvious that these are too vag¬ 
ue to mean much unless the group 
that subscribes to them has al¬ 
ready come to share generally the 
same meaning with reference to 
them, and it hardly needs mention¬ 
ing that throughout human history 
the most contradictory and varied 
specific acts have clustered under 
each of these laudable verbalisms. 

Well, suppose we could get a- 
greement on ends for this century. 
What about the twenty-fifth? Fur¬ 
thermore, still thinking of Profes¬ 
sor Muller’s chief aims, since we 
could not get rid of all the uncoop¬ 
erative dispositions within even a 
sizeable number of generations, we 
would have to breed meanwhile 
tendencies which would, be tena¬ 
cious and obstinate in their sup¬ 
port of cooperation. And these, of 
course, would be declared uncoop¬ 
erative by the genetically unselec¬ 
ted “real’’ uncooperatives. And 
then where would we be? Obvious¬ 
ly, right back there in those Id 
wars of religion and all that. So 
Professor Muller’s “chief aims" 
will not do. A program of the sort 
he envisions requires us to specify 
the ends toward which it might be 
directed. Because science cannot 
help us and because we 
cannot get consensus on ends or 
predict the course of history itself 
the effort is doomed already. 


By ANN JENKYNS 

These last few weeks have really 
been wandering ones for us, While 
wandering around the snow coun¬ 
try, we wondered just what the 
north would do without snow. 

The first conclusion we drew 
was that many ground hogs would 
be put out of business, thus leav¬ 
ing us with one less method of pre¬ 
dicting the weather for the rest of 
the winter. These animals have a 
hard enough time finding their 
shadow — without snow they’d 
be completely lost. 

SKIING WOULD ALSO go by 
the boards (or rather, the slats) 
without snow. The north would be 
left without all those enthusiastic 
people who work so hard to climb 
uphill, only to turn around at the 
top and slide down. 

Without snow, there would also 
be no Carnival. Now, that would 
be unfortunate. The. lack of snow 
would not only put skiers and 
groundhogs out of commission, it 
would prevent snow sculptures 
from being carved. 

To our minds this would be the 
very worst calamity of all. Snow 
sculptures mean snowmen. Think 
of how many people would be 
heartbroken at not being able to 
roll large balls and stack them to¬ 
gether to form a figure with a car- 


THE SECOND decisive impedi¬ 
ment to planned human evolution 
lies in man’s unique ability to re¬ 
late himself to others of his kind 
on a level of meaning which is call¬ 
ed symbolic and which cannot be 
reduced to physiological or non- 
symbolic environmental levels. The 
reader may illustrate this for him¬ 
self by attempting to account phy¬ 
siologically for any of the signifi¬ 
cant social meanings, e. g., paren¬ 
tal responsibility, property etc., 
which ramify from the distinction 
itself is indicated by'the variations 
in sex norms throughout the ga¬ 
mut of human societies past and 
present. 

Now it should be obvious that 
the ends or goals which would have 
to be validated before the direction 
of controlled evolution could be as¬ 
certained are symbolic in charac¬ 
ter. Within deviant extremes, which 
may be discounted, innate physi¬ 
cal characteristics have not been 
established as having any intrin¬ 
sic relation to the social attributes 
of human societies. Therefore, eu¬ 
genic control of physiological fac¬ 
tors would have no predictable ef¬ 
fects on social characteristics. Un¬ 
anticipated effects might well be 
wholly contrary to what was in¬ 
tended. Even intelligence, which is 
perhaps the feature attraction on 
the eugenicists program, has not 
been found correlative with the 
quality of social life. That is, to il¬ 
lustrate, the intelligence of crimi¬ 
nals has not been found to differ 
significantly from that of non¬ 
criminals. The accomplishments of 
controlled breeding in nonhuman 
areas should not mislead us here. 
After all, the ends of selective 
breeding in anitnals, for instance, 
are goals in the minds of men and 
not Platonic ideals. Fads and fash¬ 
ions in the breedings of dogs cer¬ 
tainly point this out sufficiently. Or, 
to move closer to our concern, 
whether we should worship cows or 
steak is not a queSton that can be 
answered by scientific method in 
general or genetics in particular. 

IN HIS FAILURE to consider 
cultural variability around the 
world Professor Muller neglects a 
problem of the first magnitude. 
Valued social traits differ so a- 
mong different societies that evo¬ 
lutionary genetics would have to 
develop a number of different typ¬ 
es or models to serve as guides to 
(Continued on page 5) 


rot for- a nose and coal for eyes. 

Some of these snowmen we saw 
were so realistic that we would 
almost imagine them walking a- 
round and quite alive. In fact, aft¬ 
er thinking awhile, we recall that 
we did see one of these snowmen 
alive, just the other day. 

He had coal black eyes, a long- 
ish red nose (from the wind, he 
claimed) and a long line of some¬ 
thing streaming forth from his 
mouth. Moving closer we found 
this line to be formed of words, 
flattering words. 

THIS SEEMED like a nice sort 
of snowman. He was far from be¬ 
ing the “abominable snowman" of 
myth fame. We received a very 
favorable impression and left him 
thinking that snow was quite a 
good thing to have around. 

In fact, we liked our snowman 
so well that we returned the next 
day to see him. Finding him with 
a snow friend, we made a four¬ 
some and set out for a quick drink 
before continuing our wandering. 

Stepping into the warm inn, we 
shortly became thoroughly dis¬ 
mayed. The snow was turning to 
slush. Watching our two snowmen 
slowly melting, we could only ex¬ 
plain in horror, “Abominable! 's 
no men! It’s women!” (DOWN 
WITH SNOW!) 


Just Wandering 









THE MIDDLEBURY SKI TEAM 


The Dartmouth Winter Carnival 


MILLIKIN MOTORS INC 


1 Washington Street 
Middlebury, Vermont 
Phone DUdley 8-2001 


of Women and must be submitted 
no later than March l, i960. 

Announcement of awards will be 
made by May 15. 


PASSPORT PHOTOS 

By Appointment — 99 Court St. — BEN ROGERS — — DU 8-7605 or DU 8-2862 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 3 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1960 


Connecticut Mutual Life! 

INSURANCE COMPANY • HARTFORD 




Sales and 

Sales Management 

Training Program 

• 

Home Office 

Administrative Openings 


PATRONIZE YOUR 
• ADVERTISERS • 


Nation - Wide Campus Revolt 

T aking Place Against RO I C I CONGRATULATIONS 


By DICK BLODGETT 

A nation-wide campus revolt a- 
gainst compulsory ROTC is now 
taking place, according to an arti¬ 
cle in the Feb. 8 issue of tl." S. 
News and World Report, 

The article says that several 
large land-grant universities, in¬ 
cluding Michigan State, Ohio State, 
Wisconsin and California, are 
finding much opposition to com¬ 
pulsory ROTC training in the fresh¬ 
man and sophomore years. Oppo¬ 
sition has been in the form of rall¬ 
ies and resolutions by both stu¬ 
dents and faculty members. 

The United States National Stu¬ 
dent Association, which represents 
student governments at 397 col¬ 
leges, recently passed a resolu¬ 
tion urging elimination of the com¬ 
pulsory program. 

Key Decisions 
Michigan State and the Univer¬ 
sity of Wisconsin are about to 
make key decisions. Both univer¬ 
sities will soon vote whether to a- 
bolish compulsory ROTC. 

Three land-grant colleges have 
already put ROTC on a voluntary 
basis. They are Massachusetts in¬ 
stitute of Technology, Minnesota 
and Utah State. If more colleges 
take such action it is expected to 


TRI-DELT SCHOLARSHIPS 

The seventeenth annual Delta 
Delta Delta General Fund Scholar¬ 
ship competition is now open to 
women on campuses where Tri- 
Delta chapters are located. 

Scholarships may cover up to 
$200. Applicants need not be soror¬ 
ity members. Applications may be 
obtained at the Office of the Dean 


set off a chain reaction on many 
other campuses. 

At stake in the controversy is | 
the Armed Forces’ prime source j 
of junior officers. In each of the 
next 10 years the Army will re¬ 
quire 14,000 officers from the RO¬ 
TC. The majority of regular offi¬ 
cers now in service came out of 
this program. 

Army Secretary Wilbur Brucker 
said that without compulsory RO¬ 
TC in most universities the Army 
cannot get the officers it needs. 
However, Charles C- Finucane, as¬ 
sistant secretary of defense, de-; 
dares, “The determination of po¬ 
licy will continue to be left up to 
the authorities at the educational 
insititution.” 

College officials use two main | 
arguments in defense of placing 
ROTC on a voluntary basis. With 
enrollments skyrocketing, educa¬ 
tors believe that needed class¬ 
rooms can be obtained by elimina¬ 
ting compulsory ROTC. The other 
argument is that the program has 
not kept pace with the needs of mo¬ 
dern warfare. 

The article in U. S. News and 
World Report concludes: “There 
has been a sharp shift in the atti¬ 
tude of many people in the U.S. ] 
toward military training. A few 
years ago, the big argument was 
over universal military training, 
which would have put every able- 
bodied youth in uniform for a spec¬ 
ified time. Today, the argument is 
over a program that requires from 
three to five hours a week of 
freshman and sophomore students 
in many, but not all, of the na¬ 
tion’s universities.” 


They’ve 
Done It Again. 

RON’S 

Two Midgets are 
Radio Equipped. 
DU 8-4437 


SALE 

p ur After ski Boots 

INTERVIEWS for: 

$5.95 

KELLER’S 


0 s5 

, 

N at the V 


^v v SMITH PARK ^ 
RESTAUR Ah t ^ 


Pleasant Atmosphere 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 




This Program is designed to develop young, inex¬ 
perienced men for careers in life insurance sajes 
and sales management. It provides an initial train¬ 
ing period of 8Vi months (including one month at 
a Home Office School) before the men move into 
lull sales work. 

Those trainees who are interested in and who are 
found qualified for management responsibility are 
assured of ample opportunity to move on to such 
work in either our field offices or in the Home Office 
after an initial period in sales. 

A limited number of attractive opportunities are 
also available at the Home Office for Actuarial 
Trainees and Administrative Trainees. 

The Connecticut Mutual is a 114-year-old com¬ 
pany with 500,000 policyholder-members and over 
four billion dollars of life insurance in force. 
Aggressive expansion plans provide unusual oppor¬ 
tunities for the limited number of men accepted 
each year. 

Arrange with the placement office for an inter¬ 
view with: 


ALFRED BEAUCHAMP, GENERAL AGENT 
who will he at the Placement Office Tuesday, February 16. 


Middlebury Ski Shop 


m m ' m m ^ d h . - A A a a A A A. A A A 4. A A 

FOR SALE 

ALUMNI 

NO WORRY ABOUT RESERVATIONS 
IF YOU OWN 

THIS PERFECT HOLIDAY 
LODGE 

Compact, Modern, Near Breadloaf, Ideal For Skiers. It Is Of Masonry 
Construction, All Glass To The South, 3 Rooms, 2 Fireplaces, 2 Baths, 
Kitchen, Garage, Acre of Woodland, Mountain View, Simple Mainten¬ 
ance, Walk In, Walk Out. 

PRICE: $10,000. 

TAX: $50. 

R. A. & GLADYS MURDOCH 

STROUT REALTY 
Green Mountain Place 
Middlebury, Vermont. 

DU 8-2100 









PAGE 4 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1960 







College Dep't., The Biltmore, New York 17, N. Y. 

Please reserve the following accommodations 

for-at $- 

(date and time) . (rate) 

(name)_ 

(address) ___ 

Realty Hotels, Inc., H&rry M. Anhalt, President 


Reading Class 


It filters as 
no single filter can 

for mild,full flavor! 


ON SALE 

Wool Shirts Shetland Sweaters 

Wool Bermudas Loden Coats 
Slacks Handbags 

DAWSON’S 

COLLEGE SHOP 


Plans Mature 

A team of experts from Bald¬ 
ridge Reading Services, Tnc., will 
offer on Monday a demonstration 
of methods and devices used in a 
developmental reading course that 
may be offered later in this se¬ 
mester. 

The program will include color¬ 
ed slides, demonstration of train¬ 
ing aids and discussion of training 
methods. The session, open to any 
interested student, will be held in 
Munroe 102 at 4:30 p. m, A ques¬ 
tion period and an opportunity for 
personal interviews will follow. 


POPULAR 

FILTER 

PRICE 


Everybody Meets Under The Clock 
:t The O 1 I. i' 11 O SI E in New York 




SPECIAL RATES 

for Students (B.M.O.C.s,"L.M.O.C.s, 
C.O.E.D.s) Single $8.00 
Twin: $6.25 (per person) 

Triple: $5.25 (per person) 

For Information or reservations address: 
College Department, The Biltmore, 
Madison Ave. at 43rd St„ New York 17, N.Y. 
or use this handy coupon 


FILTER 

IT! 


VALENTINE A PROBLEM? 

We have the answer! Chocolates by 

Also fine toiletries! 

Whitman — Candy Cupboard — Gobelin — Durands 


VERMONT DRUG. INC. 

The Rexall Store 

TWO REGISTERED PHARMACISTS 


Tareyton 


ROYALTY: King and queen candidates pause on their way to 
the slopes to pose for the CAMPUS photographer. Queen hopefuls 
are Susan Hibbert, Margaret Wodtke, Elizabeth Graves, Lois Boou, 
and Elizabeth Crawford. (Missing: Deborah Wetmore.) Kings-pre- 
sumptive are Richard Atkinson, Arthur Myles, Gordon Chader, 
John Gihvee arid Alan Lamson. (Missing: David Barenborg.) 


DUAL 


The developmental reading cour¬ 
se is designed to increase reading J 
speed and comprehension and to I 
give the student skill in various 
types of reading from close and 
detailed reading to scanning. 


Tenatively scheduled for March, 
the course will meet five days a ! 
week for five weeks. Hours will be j 
arranged. No academic credit will 
be given. Students will pay be¬ 
tween $100 and $125 for the volun¬ 
tary course. 

David Littlefield, instructor in 
English, who is in charge of the 
program, urged all interested to 
attend the meeting for further in¬ 
formation. 


ASP ELECTS OFFICERS 

Alpha Sigma Psi has elected of¬ 
ficers for second semester, James 
Perry ‘60 will serve as president; | 
Lee Farnham ‘60, vice-president; j 
Richard Winn ‘62, secretary; and [ 
Kenneth Rothe ‘61, treasurer. Da¬ 
vid Brown ‘60 and Frederick Busk ; 
'62 are the new social co-chairmen. : 


ALWAYS 

serving you with the best 
variety and quality of yarn 
in Middlebury. 

The College Town Shop 


The 

MIDDLEBURY RESTAURANT 

extends to you an invitation to 
enjoy the finest food in town, . . . 

TONIGHT ! 



When You Want a break from studying 
Come down to 


HERE’S HOW THE DUAL FILTER DOES IT: 

1. It combines a unique inner filter of ACTIVATED CHARCOAI_ defi¬ 

nitel y proved to make the smoke of a c ig arette mild and smooth ... 

2. with an efficient pure white outer filter. Together they bring you the 
real thin g in mildness ar.d fine tobacco taste! 



DOOQOOOQOOO 


c /u£icc>s is our middle name T. Co.) 




















Weekly CAMPUS Issue 
Requires Cooperative Effort 


Every edition of The CAMPUS 
is the result of the combined ef¬ 
forts of the staff members and 
the Addison Independent, which 
prints the paper. v 

When CAMPUS copy is sent to 
the press — 40 per cent Monday 
morning and 60 per cent Monday 
night — it is in its final structural 
form. 

As soon as copy arrives at the 
press it is marked and sized ac¬ 
cording to width and length, as 
well as type size and style. At 
the same time headlines and sub¬ 
heads are checked for length and 
accuracy. When this phase of the 
operation has been completed, the 


Schiller Flies . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
honors project is “American In¬ 
vestment in Colombia.” 

During his 17 llays there, Schiller 
is visiting five cities, including the 
capitol, Bogata. He is travelling a 
total distance of approximately 
10,000 miles. 

Several large American and Co¬ 
lombian companies have helped 
him make arrangements for his 
trip. He is financing the trip, how¬ 
ever. 

Schiller said he got the idea of 
visiting Colombia from his advis¬ 
or, Karl Anderson, professor of 
economics. “The College has been 
100 per cent cooperative,” he add¬ 
ed. 


Black Volkswagen, 
like new. 

One owner, price $1500. 
Call DU 8-2000 or 8-4474 


ZELIFF’S 

Western Auto 
Associate Store 
Home owned 

Batteries 

and 

Tires 

Come in and see our low prices 


SALE 

Insulated Parkas 

Were $19.95 . . .now only 
$14.95 at 

KELLER’S 
Middlebury Ski Shop 


copy is placed on the copy book or 
printing schedule. 

Mechanical Brain 

The copy is then sent to the lino¬ 
type machine. This machine may 
be operated manually or automa¬ 
tically. In the manual phase, the 
linotypist simply types the story 
on a keyboard similar to that of a 
typewriter. When the machine is 
operated automatically, an elec¬ 
tronic tape, perforated with a cer¬ 
tain code for each letter of the al¬ 
phabet, as well as numerals and 
punctuation marks, activates the 
linotype keyboard through the ac¬ 
tion of electrical solenoids. The 
machine then continues to func¬ 
tion without manual participation. 

The type comes from the ma¬ 
chine in the form of rectangular 
lead “slugs.” These slugs vary in 
width and depth according to the 
type size and the length of the ar¬ 
ticle. 

“Slugs are then placed in metal 
trays, or galleys, and rough proofs 
are made. These proofs are read 
for errors by members of The 
CAMPUS staff; the corrected gal¬ 
leys are then returned to the Inde¬ 
pendent. 

During the time that the galleys 
(Continued on Page 9) 

NORTON’S 
Beauty Shop 

Hair Cutting and Styling 
8 O 1/2 Main Street 
Tel: DU 8-4483 


Harvard Graduate 
Joins ROTC Staff 

Captain Lee Cunningham will 
replace Captain William Turner as 
assistant professor of military sci¬ 
ence and tactics in the ROTC de¬ 
partment. He will start teaching 
MST 31.2 second semester. 

Cunningham recently returned to 
the United States from a military 
tour in Iran as an armor adviser 
to a reconnaissance battalion of 
the Iranian Army. 

Graduating from Harvard, class 
of ‘51, Cunningham was stationed 
in Germany for three years as a 
platoon leader and communica¬ 
tions officer for a tank battalion. 
In 1957, he graduated from the 
advanced class of the armor school 
at Fort Knox, Ky. Before going to 
Iran he was in the S-3 Air CCA 
Combat Command First Armored 
Division, which handles the coordi¬ 
nate operation of armored units 
and supporting air force. 

Cunningham’s home state is Ar¬ 
kansas. He is married and has 
one son. 


OTIS 

BARBER SHOP 

Two Barbers No Waiting 


Doria’s 


FORUM: Academic Differences 


THE TOPS 

extends a welcome 
to all 

Miildlebury students 

Remember - - for fine dinners, 

STOP IN AT THE TOPS - TONIGHT! 


» V «». 4I » A <i > 1 > 

Girls! 

Liven your rooms with a potted plant! 
We have a new shipment in at 

BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

29c and 49c 


(Continued from Page 2) 
eugenic programs in various parts 
of the world, The only alternative 
to this would be some genetic ver¬ 
sion of the old “white man’s bur¬ 
den” idea or perhaps Manifest Des¬ 
tiny — ends which are certainly 
impolitic if not despicable at this 
point in human history. 

It is recognized, of course, that 
Professor Muller’s proposal is not 
part of genetic science'itself. And 
there are prominent geneticists 
who disagree with it. However, it is 
a kind of effort which dissipates 
energy and distracts thought from 
the consideration of problems that 
are appropriate to one’s special 
competency. If among the several 
divisions of intellectual enterprise 
there was greater sharing of mu¬ 
tually relevant knowledge such mis¬ 
directed effort could be avoided. 
The sheer quantity of knowledge 


Why not Bank in Town 
THE NATIONAL BANK 
OF MIDDLEBURY 


and the imperatives of specializa¬ 
tion have made obsolete the ideal 
of “Renaissance man.” Perhaps it 
is in the truly inclusive liberal-arts 
education that hope remains for the 
bridging of those gaps in interdis¬ 
ciplinary understanding over which 
we may stumble without knowing 
it. 


FREE FLICKS 

Free movies of sports car road 
races will be shown at 8 p. m. 
Sunday in Monroe 303. Sponsored 
by the ROTC Guards, the films in¬ 
clude the 1956 Pebble Beach faces, 
Palm Springs races of 1955 and the 
El Mirage hot rod drag races in 
1954, 


MIDD ELECTRIC 
SHOE REPAIR 


Member F.D.I.C. 


THE 


MIDDLEBURY INN * , 

Coffee Shop 

Snow Bowl 

Dining Room 

Pine Room 


SPRING 


IS HERE AT 


The Grey Shop 


Come in — see all the beautiful Smart 
Spring Styles arriving Daily. 


- V 

To Watch The Exciting Carnival Events- 
DONT SHIVER — IMSULATE! 

^v Suggestions: 

Duofold 2-Layer Ski Underwear 
, Bogner Stretchies 

I Buckskin Gloves 

Pre-Carnival SALE On 

i All Loden & Duffer Coats, 

V After Ski Boots 

\ j Skates and Special Ski Sets 

- —^ Numerous Ski Boots 

FRANK MAHR - SKI SHOP 

YOUR SKI HEADQUARTERS 


j FREE! [ 

j Herald Tribune Skier’s Guide f 

2 also 

s 

-l 1 can of Christi DRYGAS 

. 

£ with every 10 gallons of Texaco Gas 


CHIPMAN HILL 
RAMBLER 


g U. S. No. 7 


2 Miles North 
Middlebury, Vermont 


DU 8-4470 


















PAGE 6 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


OFF 

THE 

BOARDS 

by John Kerney Jr. 

. . .Perhaps CBS chose the 
wrong weekend to show the arts 
performed on the ski slopes. Per¬ 
haps it was the inclement weather 
that was fogging up the cameras. 
Or perhaps it was a case of mass 
confusion caused by “nomes” 
chasing in front of cameramen 
for that chance in a lifetime. At 
any rate, the “Sports Spectacu¬ 
lar’’ was something way less than 
spectacular. 

.. .The Columbia Broadcast¬ 
ing System might have had a 
lot more impressed viewers if 
they had not attempted the 
dress rehearsal at Hanover and 
had waited to see the final pro¬ 
duction on the slopes of the 
Green Mountains on Feb, 25- 
28. The players will be the 
same, the customs (which Mid- 
dlebury was also winner of 
with its sharp red sweaters and 
caps) will be the same, the 
scenery will change for the 
better, and let’s hope that the 
results nail stay the same. 

... It is a real honor for Middle- 
bury to have won the Dartmouth 
Outing Club Trophy two years in 
a row. We had previously won it 
only twice before last year. A 
great deal of credit must be given 
to the members of the class of ’63 
who were so instrumental in copp. 
ing the cup. Special praise goes 
to John Bower for his Skimeister 
award and to Dave Hanscom for 
his fine finish in the Nordic com¬ 
bine. The victory clearly demon¬ 
strates how a team can pull to¬ 
gether under a strong coach and 
captain to drive with an inspiring 
demonstration of desire to win. 

. . . .The other two winter 
teams at Middlebury have fall¬ 
en into the shadows of the ski¬ 
ers and will probably remain 
there for the duration of the 
season. The basketball team 
put together a sustained ef¬ 
fort to hold down a team that 
some believed could have set 
a court scoring record. Aid¬ 
ing this cause a great deal 
was “8 for 10” Mooney. A 
missed Middlebury field goal 
with 43 seconds to play and 
Middlebury behind by one was 
the deciding factor. 

. . . Latrielle enters tonight’s 
game with Hamilton with 42 goals 
and 14 assists. He has 35 points to 
go to beat his own NCAA record. 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, I960 


Skiers Repeat at Dartmouth 
As Bower ‘63 Capt ures Ju mp, 
Skimeister; Williams Next 


Vermont Academy 
Upsets Frosh “5” 

By ANDY TROOB 

Finals brought ill luck to the 
Middlebury Cubs, as they lost one 
contest immediately prior to the 
exams, and another just afterward. 

On Jan. 20, Coach Joe Marrone’s 
charges sustained a convincing de¬ 
feat at the hands of the Norwich 
Freshmen. The Cadets were led 
by Tony DeLia, who scored 26 
points and played a fine defensive 
game. The Panthers were cold in 
the first half and left the floor with 
a 29-18 defecit. Norwich continued 
to dominate in the second half and 
won easily, 74-56. Larry Noyes and 
Craig Stewart were the Panther 
bright spots tallying 13 points a- 
piece. 

Players Scarce 

Memorial Fieldhouse was the 
site of the Feb. 6 contest against 
Vermont Academy. The crowd saw 
a fighting Panther quintet bounce 
back from the wrong side of a 28- 
23 half time score to tie the game 
at 47-47 after regulation time had 
elapsed. However, the underman¬ 
ned Panthers were worn out and 


Panthers Win 
By 10.4 Points 
Frosh Excell 

by 

Buster 

Last weekend Middlebury’s 
strong ski team won the 
Dartmouth Carnival in Han¬ 
over for the second year in a 
row. Losing by approxima¬ 
tely two points after the first 
day of competition, the Pan¬ 
thers fought back with a tre¬ 
mendous team effort and 
edged out its nearest con- 
healthy 10 points at the end 
tender, Dartmouth, by a 
of the second day. 

In the first event, the slalom, the 
Middlebury racers shook off the 
tension of the CBS “Sports Spect¬ 
acular” TV cameras and went on 
to place its four slalom runners in 
the first seven places. Freshman 
slalom specialist, John Clough, led 
the Panthers, finishing second in 
this event. He was followed by Cap. 
tain A1 Lamson and Icky Webber, 
who finished fourth and fifth res¬ 
pectively. John Bower, the col¬ 
lege’s outstanding skimeister, plac¬ 
ed a solid seventh. 

Poor X-Country 

However, the Panther’s slalom 
victory was offset by a disappoint¬ 
ing loss to the Big Green in the 
cross country. The poor showing 
was due to a number of factors, one 
being the recent Middlebury exams 
the boys went through prior to the 
carnival which consequently left 
them a bit out of shape, John Bow¬ 
er placed second and Dave Hans 
com was seventh. When the first 
day's scores were announced, Dart¬ 
mouth was on top by 1.9 points 
On Saturday, the downhill was 
shortened due to bad weather. This 
put the panthers at a disadvantage 
because they could show their ma¬ 
ximum potential better over 
longer course because the Middle¬ 
bury racers are so good in down¬ 
hill. However, after the final Mid¬ 
dlebury man had crossed the fin¬ 
ish line, it was apparent that Mid¬ 
dlebury had frozen the carnival 
title and were on their vmy to vic¬ 
tory, Icky Webber and the Panth¬ 
er’s special downhill ace, Lee Kauf. 
man, tied for second place. John 
Clough was fourth and A1 Lam¬ 
son seventh. , 


Big Green Creamed 


SLALOM RACE 

j 5. Bookstrom 

Dartmouth 

Bookstrom 

Dartmouth 

6. Kimball 

UNH 

Clough 

Middlebury 

7. Hanscom 

Middlebury 

Delong 

Dartmouth 

9. Gibb 

Middlebury 

Lamson 

Middlebury 

10. Lamson 

Middlebury 

Webber 

Middlebury 

TEAM SCORE 

Liddle 

Norwich 

1 1. Dartmouth 

99.1 

Bower 

Middlebury 

2. Middlebury 

94.9 

TEAM SCORE 

3. UNH 90.8 

Middlebury 99.3 


JUMPING 

Dartmouth 97.0 


11. Bower 

Middlebury 

Norwich 91.6 


2. Hanscom 

Middlebury 

DOWNHILL-RACE 

3. Bookstrom 

Dartmouth 

Delong 

Dartmouth 

4. Small 

UNH 

Webber 

Middlebury 

5. Lamson 

Middlebury 

Kaufman 

Middlebury 

14. Sinclair 

Middlebury 

Clough 

Middlebury 

COMBINED ONLY 

Harris 

■MCGill 

7. U1DO 


Hackley 

Dartmouth 

TEAM JUMP 

Lamson 

Middlebury 

1. Middlebury 

99.5 



2. UNH 94 R 

COMBINED 

ONLY 





3. Dartmouth 

93.4 

Bower 

tie for fourth 

NORDIC 

COMBINED 

TEAM SCORE 

1. Bower 

Middlebury 

Middlebury 99.4 


2. Bookstrom 

Dartmouth 

Dartmouth 97.4 


3. Hanscom 

Middlebury 

McGill 96.2 


4. Bigelow 

Dartmouth 

downhill - 

SLALOM 

5. Bean 

Dartmouth 

Delong 

Dartmouth 

6. Lamson 

Middlebury 

Webber 

Middlebury 

7. Gibb 

Middlebury 

Clough 

Middlebury 

NORDIC TEAM 

Lamson 

Middlebury 

1. Middlebury 

99.1 

Bower 

Middlebury 

2. Dartmouth 

(97.1 

Bookstrom 

Dartmouth 

3, UNH 

89.9 

ALPINE TEAM 

FINAL 

RESULTS 

Middlebury 99.4 


1. Middlebury 

591.6 

Dartmouth 97.1 


2. Dartmouth 

581.2 

McGill 93.9 


3. UNH 

542.5 

CROSS - COUNTRY 

4. Norwich ’ 

523.6 

Bigelow 

Dartmouth 

5. Maine 

517.1 

Bower 

Middlebury 

6. Williams 

502.1 

Lund 

Dartmouth 

7. McGill 

483.1 

Bean 

Dartmouth 

8. Vermont 

459.0 


Bower Romps 

This victory seemed to drive the 
team on to its impressive jumping 
victory. It was apparent that the 
team that jumped the best would 
win the carnival. John Bower 
came through as expected and won 
this event. He was followed by 
Dave Hanscom, who was second. 
A1 Lamson was fifth and John Sin¬ 
clair was fourteenth, Lowrie Gibb 
jumped very well but did not place 
in the special jumping because he 
was entered in the Nordic Combin¬ 
ed which is a “paper” event. Thus, 
with a tremendous team effort, 
Middlebury won the Dartmouth 
Carnival by ten points, 

Special tribute should be made 
to freshman John Bower for win¬ 
ning the title of skimeister his first 
year in college competition. Also, 


Recess Hurts Sextet; Post 
8-6 Tab, But Latreille Rolls 


By CORKY ALLEN 

Two hockey games were played 
in the week before final exams. 
Against Norwich on Thursday, the 
Panthers won a decisive 9-2 vic¬ 
tory. The highlight of the game 
was Phil Latreille’s scoring punch. 
All four of his goals came with a 
Middlebury player in the penalty 
box. Dates Fryberger opened the 
scoring at 4:34 of the first period 
with an assist from his brother 
Jerry, and Latreille, followed with 
two more goals. Tor Hultgreen 
then lit the light with an assist 
from Latreille even though the 
Panthers were again a man down. 

Norwich scored both of its goals 


| dlebury took on a vastly improv¬ 
ed Colby team from Maine, but 
lost a close battle 7-5. Hultgreen 
opened the scoring just after a few 
minutes of play with an assist go¬ 
ing to Barry White, but Colby 
came right back with three goals. 
In the second period, Jerry Fry¬ 
berger scored on a breakaway aft¬ 
er a long pass from Latreille, but 
again Colby widened the gap with 
two more goals. In the final 
frame, Ed Germond started a ral¬ 
ly with a score off an opposing 
defenseman’s pads. Latreille who 
had switched back to defense then 
scored two quick backhand shots 
to tie the game. A Middlebury pen- 


in the first two frames with Mid- j alty a short time later gave Colby 
dlebury at least one man short, j the chance to take the lead once 
In the second period Latreille scor- j again. With just thirty seconds re¬ 
ed twice and Bob Fryberger once. | maining in the game, goalie 
Fryberger was assisted by both of! Chuck Gately was pulled from the 
his brothers. Art Wilkes broke into j cage in favor of a sixth man, but 
the scoring column in the third 1 a long Colby shot at the nets spoil- 
period with two goals, both assist- j ed the gamble making the score 
ed by Freshman John Weekes. j 7-5. Penalties and poor defensive 
The following Saturday night, play again cracked the Panther 
the Panthers travelled to the Ro- victorfy bid. Also, the loss of de- 
yal Military College of St. John’s fenseman Keith Dollar due to a leg 
and were beaten by a score of 5-4. j injury in the first period was very 
Latreille scored all four goals for j significant. 


Middlebury with Bob Fryberger as¬ 
sisting on three of them. Latreille’s 


The 


Rout at Point 

next day saw the 


West 


finally tasted a bitter l point de-1 to Dave Barenborg and assistant 
feat, 57-56. Tom Swift was high coach Herb Thomas for their cham- 
scorer with 19 points. Noyes and pionship efforts and a final tribute 
Jimmy Woods led the Panthers j should be made to coach “Bobo” 
with 17 and 15 markers respec- Sheehan who was the main factor 
tively. in the Panther’s victory. 


last score was unassisted. RMC Point Cadets hand the Panthers 
led 2-1 after the first period, but La- their third straight loss, 6-2. Mid- 
treille put Middlebury ahead 4-3 dlebury played minus the services 
in the second frame. RMC tied the of defensemen Dick Morrison and 
game though and then won it in Keith Dollar. Latreille scored both 
the last period. The decisive fac- of the Panther goals, and he 
tor of the game was the speed and came close on two other shots that 
hustle of the opposing team, and hit the posts of the goal. As usual, 
also the fact that two Middlebury the Middlebury defense was unable 
players missed the game because to cope with the wide open type 
of pre-exam jitters. of hockey played especially on the 

After ten days of exams, Mid- oversized’West Point rink. 


B-Ballers Drop 
Three More; 
Rand Returns 

By ERIC IIORSTING 

Collegiate sports are probably 
the most unpredictable contest in 
the world today. Basketball is a 
collegiate sport. Therefore, basket¬ 
ball is unpredictable. 

In its last two games, Middle¬ 
bury’s basketball team proved this 
point. Just before the mid-year 
break, the Panthers lost to an un¬ 
heralded Norwich five. Then the 
“ups and downs” team bounced 
back to nearly upset a very strong 
team from Springfield College. The 
latter contest was one of the clos¬ 
est and most exciting played at 
Memorial Fieldhouse in the last 
three years. 

Cadets Conquor 
The team did not fare well a- 
gainst Norwich, who pulled a sur¬ 
prising 74-73 upset over the Pan¬ 
thers on Wednesday Jan. 20, at 
Norwich. 

Controlling the boards well, Nor¬ 
wich was able to stay within two 
Points at the half, when Middle¬ 
bury led, 39-37. A couple of quick 
baskets by Norwich sent them in¬ 
to the lead, and then it seesawed 
back and forth until the final min¬ 
utes. With 17 seconds to go, Mid¬ 
dlebury was ahead, 73-70. Udell of 
Norwich then broke away for two 
straight layups, stealing the ball 
from Bill Dyson for the last winn¬ 
ing basket. 

Udell scored 26 for Norwich, as 
did Ken Stone for Middlebury. 
Howie Wiley had 21 for the Pan¬ 
thers, and Sweeney and Potvin of 
Norwich hit double figures with 18 
and 15 respectively. Finally, Bill 
Dyson continued to stand out with 
his tremendous ball handling. 

Near Upset 

Excitement surged to its highest 
pitch of the season as a crowd, 
composed mainly of local towns¬ 
people, saw Middlebury’s Panthers 
throw a scare into a superb Spring- 
field basketball squad last Satur¬ 
day. Springfield won by only 89.84 
in a game marked by excelleht 
play on both sides. 

Middlebury was down by only 
five at the half, 51-46. The second 
half was touch and go, but the 
Panthers could never get closer 
than two or three to the pacemak¬ 
ing scoring of Springfield, A com¬ 
bination of height and perhaps a 
superior offensive pattern were the 
differences which kept Springfield . 
in front for most of the game. 

Springfield won despite sterling 
performances by Co-captain Wiley, 
who scored 21, Stone, who scored 
18 and played outside for the first 
time this year, and Ted Mooney, 
who couldn’t miss with that one- 
hander from the corner. Leading 
the Springfield aggregation was 
DiChiero, who tied Wiley for the 
overall scoring lead with 21. 

Jeffs on Top 

The Middlebury basketball team 
traveled down to Amherst, Mass, 
with the hope of pulling a major 
upset over highly rated Amherst 
College. The Lord Jeffs had other 
intentions and pulled away in the 
second half and finally won, 82-59, 
The first half ended with Amherst 
out in front 47-34, but Middlebury 
moved up within six points after 
the half. Co.captain Wiley was high 
man for the Panthers with 15 fol¬ 
lowed by Mooney with 14, Ken 
Stone with 12. 





THE CAMPUS, M1DDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 7 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1960 



• ■ 




t ' ' 

| < , ' 




AND 


The first semester of the teach¬ 
er-training program has concluded 
with “satisfying if intangible” re¬ 
sults. Students who have spent 11 
weeks practice teaching in the 
Middlebury public-school system 
are enthusiastic supporters of the 
new program, directed by Charles 
S. Grant. 

The reactions of student teach¬ 
ers themselves are indicative of 


Freshmen Debate 
FEPC Proposa l 

Approximately 65 freshmen turn¬ 
ed out on the evening of Jan. 19 
to discuss the EPC proposal with 
the Student Educational Policy 
Committee and Dean of Faculty 
John G. Bowker. 

Kenneth Haupt ’60, acting as 
moderator, gave an introductory 
speech, after which six members 
of the SEPC gave short explana¬ 
tory talks on the three sections of 
the proposal. A question-and 
-answer period followed, during 
which the committee members and 
Dean Bowker answered questions 
about specific points in the propos. 
al. 

The discussion was scheduled to 
last an hour, but about one-third 
of the students remained after that 
period for further questions and 
discussion. 

Many of the sophomores, juniors 
and seniors have had opportunity 
for similar explanation and dis¬ 
cussion in sororities and fratern¬ 
ities with members of the FEPC. 
However, this is the first time the 
freshmen have been able to parti¬ 
cipate in a program of this sort, 
and SEPC was ‘‘pleased with the 
interest that was shown.” 


ADDISON COUNTY 
TRUST CO. 

“The bank of Friendly Service” 
Member F.D.I.C. 


I the superiority of an actual teach- 
! ing experience over pure theory. 
Antoinette Tesoniero, who taught 
English to a ninth-grade class, 
found the application of theories 
she had learned “something of an 
| eye-opener.” Her teaching exper- 
* ience also gave her a closer con- 
\ tact with the people of Middlebury 
j and a greater understanding of the ! 
town as a whole, she added. 

Janet Krei, who conducted a fif¬ 
th-grade class, summed things up 
] like this: “You can study methods 
until you’re blue in the face, but 
you’ll never know until you’ve ac¬ 
tually faced a group what it’s like 
to try to put an idea across.” She 
went on to remark how “challeng¬ 
ing the motivation of young minds 
can be.” Confronted with the vivid 
imagination of fifth-graders, she 
began to realize that teaching is 
| “a very real and vital task.” 

Grant admitted to a great admi¬ 
ration for the present group of stu¬ 
dent teachers: “Since this is my 
| ‘maiden voyage’ and my first crop 
of trainees, I have no basis for 
comparison; but in my opinion 
1 they have done a fine job,” He 
mentioned that the schools — chil¬ 
dren, regular teachers and princi¬ 
pals — had'cooperated to the full- 
I est. 


Katharine Gibbs 
Memorial 
Scholarships 

Full tuition for one year 
plus $500 cash grant 

Open to senior women interested in 
business careers as assistants to ad¬ 
ministrators and executives. 

Outstanding training. Information 
now available at the College Place¬ 
ment Bureau. 

BOSTON 16, MASS. . 21 Marlborough St. 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. . . 230 Park Ave. 
MONTCLAIR, N. J. . . 33 Plymouth St. 

PROVIDENCE 6, R. I. . . 155 Angell St. 


KATHARINE 

GIBBS 

SECRETARIAL 


ED and BUD’S « W 


BARKER SHOP 

Behind Eagan's Drug Store 


Have your car serviced at 


CAMPUS 

TIIEATKE DU 8-4841 MIDI) VT 
MAT. SATURDAY 1:30 P.M. 
MAT. SUNDAY 2:30 P.M. 


Results of New Teaching Program 
Evaluated, Pronounced “ Satisfying 99 


ATTENTION 1960 GRADUATES 


PROVONCHA’S 
ESSO STATION 

‘Moose” Provoncha, Prop. 


wwm 

No Mob Scenes of 

/Mao f?/p£R glen 

NEW T-BAR 

800 per hour 

CHAIR LIFT 

500 per hour 

0r| e or the other will take you to 
the top of a trail or two just right 
f°r you, Twelve trails and an open 
s| ope to choose from, ranging from 
Ver y gentle to mighty steep. That’s 
wh Y M's the real skiers' paradjse! 

COME TO 

/Mao f?/V£R GL€N 

Waitsfield, Vermont 

Where Skiers' Dreams 
Come Truel 


THURS.-SAT. FEB. 11-13 

Double Feature 

“The Best of 
Everything’’ 

With Hope Lange - Rob’t Evans 
“Intriguing Entertainment Not 
to be Soon Forgotten” 

TT'pLUS 

FRED MacMURRAY 

“The Oregon Trail” 


SL’N.-TUES. 


FEB. 14-16 


“Woman Like Satin” 

She couldn’t love a man completely 
until she dragged him down to her 
own passionate level. 


“The American 
Look” 


WED.-THURS. 


TEB. 17-18 


“Libel” 


A man battles for his identity 
on the razor edge of madness 

SPECIAL SHOW SATURDAY 
AT 10 A.M. FEB. 13 
FREE SHOWING 
— WOMEN ONLY — 
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY 
VERMONT DIVISION PRESENTS 
“TIME & TWO WOMEN — 
SELF BREAST EXAMINATION” 


“CAREER SALES OPPORTUNITY” 

with national company, 125 years old. This sales posi¬ 
tion provides a training program, doesn’t involve any 
travel, gives guaranteed monthly income and future 
advancement into sales management. Liberal fringe 
and pension benefits are provided. For the right man 
this opportunity could provide him with an income up to 
$6,000 the first year. Write P. O. Box 622, Burlington, 
Vermont, for interview. Include brief personal history 
giving marital and draft status. 


Would you like to work, live and play in Vermont. 


The whole is equal 
to the sum of its parts 

(But some of its parts are more equal than others J) 


Even Euclid had to admit... 


It's what's up front 
that counts 


Euclid proved that a straight 
line is the shortest distance 
between two points. And if 
you’ll walk a straight line to the 
nearest pack of Winstons, you’ll 
find it the shortest distance to 
a really enjoyable smoke. It’s 
the tobacco up front that makes 


the difference and that’s where 
Winston packs its own exclusive 
Filter-Blend—a special selection 
of light, mild tobacco, specially 
processed for filter smoking. 
You’ll find Filter-Blend gives 
Winston a flavor without paral¬ 
lel. In fact, it’s axiomatic that... 


WINSTON TASTES GOOD, LIKE A CIGARETTE SHOULD! 












PAGE 8 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, I960 


Mastery of the Bongo Board 


Becomes New 

By RUTH GODDARD 

The Bongo Board craze is sweep¬ 
ing the nation, or at least the 
northeastern part of it! This 
device, a board balanced across a 
grooved roller, has been gleefully 
adopted by ski teams (including 
Middlebury’s) as their very own, | 
but it will not be long before staid, 
balding businessmen will roll up 
their sleeves, hold their breaths, 
step gingerly on the board, and 
crash land in a heap on the floor, 

And what started all this merry 
activity? A shrunken head ( or ra¬ 
ther the lack of one.) When Nina 
Washburn ’63 was eleven years 
old, she decided quite suddenly 
that she wanted to be different; she 
wanted something that no one else 
had, So she asked her father for a 
shrunken human head for Christ¬ 
mas. Mr. Washburn did not flinch 
at this unsuspected appearance of 
the primitive instinct in his daugh¬ 
ter; he reached a compromise — 
either a shrunken head or some¬ 
thing that no one else had in the 
whole wide world. 

African Toy 

Mr. Washburn, a widely travel¬ 
ed man, remembered seeing Afri¬ 
can and Indian children playing on 
a board laid across a tree round, 
so he decided to bring this part of 
ancient civilization to the back¬ 
ward United States. At first he 


l . S. Pastime 

tried to imitate the toy exactly, 
using a board and a tree branch 
but he decided it was too danger¬ 
ous. Then he thought of using a 
grooved roller and a top board 
with center rail and end stops. This 
was merely precarious, but he had 
faith in his daughter’s ability to 
master the thing. 

This faith was justified. Nina be¬ 
came so expert that she was able 
to challenge the then U. S. Olympic 
ski champion to a match. Nina 
stayed on for 22 minutes. The ski 
jumper fell after six seconds. 

Coming Craze 

Today many skiers use the 
boards, the Middlebury team a- 
mong them. But skiers will not be 
able to maintain a monopoly for 
j long. Soon the great American pub¬ 
lic will demand the boards as their 
right, and the toy makers will hap¬ 
pily oblige. 

The ladies’ weight reduction 
class at the gym will use them. 
Children will scoff at their parents 
for falling off and breaking their 
necks, Songs will be written of 
them and odes composed to them. 
Civilization will make its inroads 
upon them and they will be made 
of metal, plastic and synthetic fib¬ 
ers and painted in beautiful deco¬ 
rator colors. They will become a 
sport in themselves and national 


competitions will develop. A book ] 
of rules will have to be written to 
prevent unfair practices. Ameri¬ 
cans will cherish it as a national 
pastime, and it will take its right¬ 
ful place in folklore alongside Tid¬ 
dlywinks and the hula hoop. Fifty 
years from now who will remem¬ 
ber why it all started? Because a 
little girl wanted something differ¬ 
ent for Christmas, something as 
different as a human head. 


No Doubt.... 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Merrill ’60, had a wonderful part | 
to work with and made it into an [ 
amusing picture of the contempo- 
! rary genus beatnik, 

Brian Pendleton ’63 let the au- ' 
dience know that he was delighted J 
to entertain them as Mud-Eye, an [ 
incurably optimistic gold prospec- 
, tor. 

Choreography by Susan Otto ’60 
and Marjorie Gassner ’62 was re¬ 
freshing and original, somewhat ' 
j reminiscent of that old soft shoe. 
The men’s and women’s choruses 
{ were very well trained and sang 
and danced with aplomb. Elinor 
Hood ’60, Miss Gassner and Me¬ 
linda Kernochan ’63 were particu¬ 
larly outstanding. 

j Geismar, composer and musical 
arranger, led jjie orchestra' on the 
! piano with Vcevold Strekalovsky 
’60 on guitar and banjo; Lynn E- 
wing ’60 on flute, and Robert Cain 
’60 on percussion. 


SALE 

Wool Face Masks 

$3.95 


Summer School 

CLARK UNIVERSITY 

Intersession June 6-25 

One course — Three semester hours 
Summer Session June 27 - Aug. 12 


KELLERS 

Middlebury Ski Shop 


Two courses — Six semester hours 
Co-educational 

Arts — Sciences — Education — Business 
Write for Bulletin, Worcester 10, Mass. 


OPEN! 


Benjamin’s Self Service, Coin Operated 

AUTOMATIC LAUNDRY 

Superbly equipped with Philco-Bendix 


LARGE WASHER 

SMALL WASHER 

16 lbs. 

10 lbs. 

-o- 

O 

CO 

20 0 


Large Dryers Available at 

BENJAMIN BROS. 


Benjamin Block 


Middlebury, Vt. 


’LL BE SO GLAD YOU SENT ... j 

VA L B N T I N B 8 


fr 

Iv 

7k 



& 



The perfect way to remember 
friends and loved ones is with 
Hallmark Valentines for every 
age, every taste . . . lacy, old 
fashioned cards . . . senti- 
I V mental ones . . . traditional 
/ j% hearts . . . witty, sophisticated 
1ST Contemporary Cards and a 
complete selection of inexpen- 
sive Valentines for the children's 
school boxes. And for your 
. Valentine gifts we have Hallmark 
k Gift Wraps, ribbons and matching 
enclosures. Shop for yours today. 


PARK DRUG STORE 

"TRY THE DRUG STORE FIRST" 


Keen Audience Hears Rehfuss 

(Continued from Page 1) | Rehfuss sang another song by 

the idea of adding to the text, not , Schubert. 

obscuring it. I His is a marvelous voice, capa- 

The high point of the evening ble of great size and warmth and 
was the singer’s last selection, j great subtlety and humor. It is 
“Songs and Dances of Death,’’ by most unfortunate indeed that more 
Moussorgsky in the French text, of us could not hear him. His ac- 
Rehfuss, through his delivery, companist, Charles Reiner, did not 
made this dramatic cycle so acces- seem to measure up to Rehfuss’ 
sible that the lack of translation stature, but, in a secondary role, 
was not so apparent. As an encore, such would be difficult. 


Vacation’s Over - - 
and 

The DOG TEAM 

is 

OPEN!! 

i 


Reservations please 


Carnival 1960 

Complete with a brand new 1960 Ford. 

Snow tires, ski equipped, ready to go 

for you and your date. 

Due to popular demand, reservations must be made 
soon. 

So sec your 

AVIS-RENT-A-CAR 

agent today 

DU 8-7752 

W. H. SIMONDS & CO. 

Court Street Middlebury, Vt. 


“When Groundhog Day has come and gone, 

And almost lost to human mind; 

This question must be met anon: 

Is Valentine’s Day far behind?” 

“Hmmmm,” hmmmmed Mr. Blair, the genial prop, of The 
Vermont Book Shop, “Not bad, but it doesn’t scan.” He was 
speaking to Percy Bysse Berman, Middlebury College’s Poet 
Lariat (“Lariat” because he writes mostly western poetry). “We 
must have something good for Valentine’s Day.” 

Berman threw out his chest and tried again: 

“ ‘Tain’t no voodoo, 

‘Tain’t no hex; 

I fear my troubles 

Stem from sex,” 

“No, no, no, no! That’s not the idea at all,” stated Mr. Blair, 
clenching his teeth so hard that his pipe stem crunched like a 
Nabisco. “We want something that will make all red-blooded Mid¬ 
dlebury boys and girls think of Valentine gifts for their loved ones. 
For their hated ones, for that matter, but that’s a bit hard to put 
across. Something that will make them buy books and records for 
the gift. Can you think of anything to rhyme with 'free gift-wrap¬ 
ping’?” 

“Snapping, scrapping, slapping, napping . . 

Mr. Blair yawned. “Mmmmmmm. Reminds me. Almost time 
for . . . no, can’t right now. No, look, Mr. Berman, here we have a 
store that is crammed with thousands of books and records. It is 
very, very appropriate on St. Valentine’s Day for a boy or a girl 
to remember his girl or boy, as the case may be, er, or even boys 
and girls or girls and boys, buy a small gift. It need not be ex¬ 
pensive — one of these attractive one-dollar Peter Pauper editions 
from that rack by the door, or a few paperbound books will do the 
trick. We’ll gift-wrap the book or record at no charge, and it will 
make the birl or goy very happy. Or girls and boys.” v 

Mr. Blair puffed thoughtfully on his pipe. “Another thing to 
bring into the poem is this: if you buy a record for your loved one, 
it is your Record Club card that is punched, and YOU are that much 
closer to a free record, not your loved one, so that it is better to 
give than to receive. If your loved one has a stereo machine, you 
know that we have a large selection of stereo records from $2.98 
up. Work that in too.” 

Mr, Blair yawned again. “I’m going downstairs to check some 
invoices. When you finish the poem, wake me and we’ll go over it. 
Remember, Valentine’s Day is Sunday, so put a little push into the 
pentameter. Everyone must give books and records! Free gift¬ 
wrapping! Thousands of books and records to choose from! Why, 
your poem will be more stirring than ‘The Iliad’!” 















THE CAMPUS, MIDDL1BURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1960 


Conference Schedules Five 
Noted Educators For March 


Addison Press Furnishes Finished 
Product of Week - Long Chaos 

prepared for final printing under 
the supervision of the make-up 
man at the press and the executive 
editor of The CAMPUS. 

In the event that any one story 
runs shorter than anticipated, un¬ 
typed slugs, called “leads,” are in¬ 
serted between the lines of typed 
slugs at regular intervals to leng¬ 
then the article. Leads are also 
apart from an article, as well as 
separating headlines from the ar¬ 
ticles themselves. 

The Final Phase 

Following this step, full page 
proofs of the entire issue are 
made. These proofs are again 
read for errors by The CAMPUS 
staff. 

When this final check has been 
made, forms are taken to the 
main press and printed. After 
printing has been completed, the 
papers are run through a folding 
machine. 

The work of the Addison Inde¬ 
pendent is complete when The 
CAMPUS picks up the 2250 news¬ 
papers on Thursday afternoon. 


Spring Conference 
Set at Northfield 


(Continued from Page 5) 
are being checked for errors, the 
type is placed on a table called a 
"bank” at the printer's, where it 
remains until corrections are made. 

Make-Up 

When the gallies are returned, 
proper headlines are inserted ov¬ 
er all articles. After this check 
the type is transferred to the 
make-up table, where it is fitted in 
CAMPUS page forms. The type is 
secured within these forms and 


Remember, Drive With Care 


FREEMAN SERVES 

Vice-President Stephen A. Free¬ 
man spent Feb. 1-2 in Washington, 
D. C., serving on a panel to evalu¬ 
ate language training in the For¬ 
eign Service Institute of the De. 
partment of State. 


Do You Think for Yourself ? 


(DIAL IN THESE QUESTIONS AND SEE IF YOU’RE IN FOCUS*) 


on Cape Cod is seeking specialized and general coun¬ 
selors for (he coming summer. Previous camp exper¬ 
ience essential. Good salaries for qualified applicants, 

I 

Will interview at Middlebury. Please write to 


MR. MARK BUDD 


37 Cedar Street, Newton Centre, Mass. 




If you saw a full-rigged sailing ship in the middle of 
the desert, would you say (A) ‘‘Long time no sea!” 
(B) “Wish they’d invent talking mirages,” or (C) 
“Anything can happen in Las Vegas!” 


smoke Viceroy. They know only Viceroy 
has a thinking man’s filter—the most 
advanced filter design of them all. And 
only Viceroy has a smoking man’s taste 
. . . the full rich taste of choice tobacco. 

*If you have checked (C) in three out of 
four questions, you’re pretty sharp ... but 
if you picked (B), you think for yourself ! 


When a man says, ‘‘Brevity 
is the soul of wit,” he means 
(A) he’s about to make a 
long speech; (B) wise 
thoughts come in short sen¬ 
tences; (C) “Shut up!” 


You’re caught in a pouring 
rain—and you’re offered a 
lift by a pal whose driving 
is dangerously erratic. 
Would you (A) tell him 
you enjoy walking in the 
rain? (B) say, “Sure—but 
let me drive”? (C) accept 
rather than hurt his 
feelings? 


In choosing a filter ciga¬ 
rette, would you pick one 
that (A) says the filter 
doesn’t count, only the to¬ 
bacco; (B) is designed to 
do the best filtering job for 
the best taste; (C) gives 
you an enormous filter but 
very little taste. 


Evcrt/one is 


When you think for yourself. . . you de¬ 
pend on judgment, not chance, in your 
choice of cigarettes. That is why men and 
women who think for themselves usually 


Fisher Travel Agency 
l o make plans for the next trip away! 


Familiar pack 
or crush-proof box. 


The Man Who Thinks for Himself Knows — 

ONLY VICEROY HAS A THINKING MAN’S FILTER...A SMOKING MAN’S TASTE! 


Dinner 

at 

(Etyc ma^bnt\ 

Reservations Please 

j ^rm 

DU 8-4372 

Dinner 6:00 - 8:30 

Closed Tuesdays 

* 



01V60, Brown & Williamson Tobacco Ton' 






PAGE 10 

Chaplain Attends 
Danfortli Study 

Charles P. Scott, College chap¬ 
lain, and Dale Branum, assistant 
chaplain, recently attended a con¬ 
ference at the Danforth Founda¬ 
tion in St. Louis, to discuss reli¬ 
gion on the college campus and 
the nature of the college ministry. 

The Danforth Foundation Con¬ 
ference was intended to call in all 
members of the seminary intern 
plan, in which Branum is a parti¬ 
cipant. One of the many plans 
sponsored by the Danforth Founda¬ 
tion, this one has sent 25 semina¬ 
rians to college campuses over the 
United States, in order that they 
may become better acquainted 
with the college ministry. 

The Danforth Foundation, which 
sponsors many plans of this na¬ 
ture, is primarily interested in 
“religion in higher education,” 
Chaplain Scott remarked. He add¬ 
ed, “I think it's wonderful Middle- 
bury is honored to be a part of it.” 

Course Offered 
Recent Graduates 

JFtadcliffe College will offer a 
course in publishing procedures 
from June 22 to Aug. 3. The course, 
which is open to 50 men and wo¬ 
men, college graduates, provides 
practical training in the basic 
techniques of publishing. 

Lectures, field trips, seminars 
and workshops will provide in_ 
sight into the development of a 
book from manuscript to publish¬ 
ed copy and preparation of a dum¬ 
my for a magazine. 

Tuition is $200. Two scholarships 
are available. Application forms 
and further information may be 
obtained from Helen D. Venn, 
Director, Publishing Procedur¬ 
es Course, Radcliffe College, Cam- 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, i 960 


The Best 


Service 


For Your Car 


CYR’S SUNOCO 


Reduced Drastically! 

Ship ’n Shore Blouses 
Shapely Blouses 
Men’s heavy Sweaters 
PLUS 

All Ski Equipment 


Lazarus Department Store 


Like Spaghetti and Pizza? 

The BARRACUDA RESTAURANT 

serves the best in Middlebury 

When you eat downtown, stop in and 
see us for really fine food. 

Any orders to take out will be delivered to your dorm or 
fraternity house. Ilot pizzas our specialty! 
Transportation Extra Phone DU 8-9301 


DIRTY laundry is still getting the 
RUSH to QuesneVs for the easiest 
most efficient cleaning! 

FRESHMEN know as well as upperclass¬ 
men that QuesneVs has it’s own 
delivery service. QuesneVs does all 
necessary mendng free! 

Most people are COMMITTED to 
QuesneVs superior laundering job. 
Leave your laundry with your 
shirts, and stop back 
in a day. 

GO QUESNEL ! 


LUCKY STRIKE presents . 


bridge, 38, Mass. 

SALE 

After Ski Boots 

fur lined 

Were $12.95 Now $9.95 


KELLER’S 
Middlebury Ski Shop 



BOB ORTII 


Your Friend For 
LIFE 


NEW ENGLAND 



FROOD TELLS HOW TO 
CLEAN UP ON YOUR LAUNDRY 


(see below) 


Dear Dr. Frood: Do you believe in the 
old adage, “Choose a girl by ear rather 
than by eye”? Shopping 

Dear Shopping: This maxim is indeed a 
fine guide for any young man who is look¬ 
ing for a girl. But while choosing by “ear 
rather than by eye,” he should also make 
sure she has two of each. 


Dear Dr. Frood: I told my girl I was in 
love, and she laughed. I told her I wanted 
to get married, and she laughed. How 
can I make her realize that I’m serious? 

Serious 


Dear Dr. Frood: Every night I come 
home tired and I find the house in a mess. 
There are .dirty dishes and pans in the 
sink, and clothes are thrown all around. 
I'm fed up. What should I do? 

Monied Student 

r i x ' 


Dear Dr. Frood: How far ahead should 
1 call fora date? Straight Arrow 

Dear Straight Arrow: It depends. Some 
girls must be called at least a week in 
advance. With others, you just holler as 
you enter the dorm. 


Dear Serious: Marry someone. 


Dear Dr. frood: I have been having 
trouble slec ting at night. Do you think 
it could be because I drink coffee? 

Wide-Eyed 

Door Wid. -Eyed: Possibly. It’s very 
difficult to : !cep while drinking coffee. 


Dear Dr. Frood: My husband is an ab¬ 
sent-minded college professor. He went 
out 7 years ago to buy a pack, of Luckies 
and hasn't returned yet. I don't know 
what to do. Patience 

Dec.i Palience: Better buy another pack. 
1 le's probably smoked them all by now. 


‘jde.if: You should 
aniccnc lias obviously 


Dear D- ood: A lot of the guys com¬ 
plain because their mothers don't pack 
their laur. 'ry boxes properly. Is there a 
certain w. tiiey should be packed? 

Spokesman 

Dear Spokesman: Indeed there is. Clip 
out the instructions below and mail them 
to your mother. 


COLLEGE STUDENTS SMOKE 
MORE LUCKIES THAN 
ANY OTHER REGULAR! 


LUCKY 

STRIKE 


When it comes to choosing their regular smoke, 
college students head right for fine tobacco. 
Result: Lucky Strike tops every other regular 
sold. Lucky’s taste beats all the rest because 
L.S./M.F.T.—Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. 


’vr$ fOAf riC' 


Instruction i.' 

1. Place bills of varying denominations in shirt 
collars (A) to keep them stiff. 

2. Wrap socks around rolls of dimes (B) to keep 
them from getting mismated. 

3. Place other change In pockets (C) of khaki 
pants. This way it won't roll around and rattle 
In the box. 


TOBACCO AND TASTE TOO FINE TO FILTER! 

Product of o /&,dntA4e<m <JvfHiceo-C!cnyxany — o/u&ueefr is our middle name 



©,4. T.Co.